Thus, I suspect, he’d have focused on the lost-in-the-gumbo “highlight” that determined the outcome of Sunday’s nationally televised game between the 10-2 Eagles and 9-3 Rams.

In the third quarter the Rams led, 28-24, when, on third-and-9 from the Rams’ 39, Carson Wentz threw incomplete toward receiver Alshon Jeffery. The Eagles would have to punt or try a very long field goal.

At the top of the hour (10 a.m. PST), all within seconds of each other, come nine kickoffs — an amazing sight for those who grew up with access to only, say, a Jets game, a Giants game and on some weeks a doubleheader national game. And this is where Siciliano really goes to work, using all his knowledge and instincts gained in roles ranging from preseason play-by-play announcer for the Rams to his weekday job as host of NFL Network’s “Up to the Minute.”

It’s far from a one-man show. Some 120 people are needed to produce the Red Zone and Fantasy Zone channels, including game-loggers, highlight editors and graphics technicians. And on set with Siciliano are his three right-hand men — researchers William Kalec, Daniel Burris and Jasyn Thibault — who give him immediate answers to questions that arise.

Sherman is consistent. He’ll go after Tom Brady on the field or Skip Bayless on national television. He’s honest and not afraid to express his opinions on football or social issues. That makes him an easy target for criticism.

Rhodes was the Vikings’ second pick of the first round and the third from Florida State, tying Alabama for most. He set a rookie record with 23 passes defensed in just 13 games (six starts). Rhodes started all 16 games each of the next two seasons, helping Minnesota’s pass defense improve from 31st to seventh in 2014. He had another team record with a 100-yard interception return in 2016, one of five picks he had in a Pro Bowl season.

Jones, an athletic pass rusher out of UCLA, appeared in 59 games in four years with Green Bay, but made just seven starts. His limited role made him expendable, and the Vikings signed him to a one-year contract in March.

Her punishment didn’t end there.

When Jackson’s “Damita Jo” album came out two months after the 2004 Super Bowl, she was facing a mountain of obstacles. As Rolling Stone reported, Viacom — the parent company then of both CBS and MTV — [hit] back . . . by essentially blacklisting her, keeping her music videos off their properties MTV, VH1 and radio stations under their umbrella. The blacklist [spread] to include non-Viacom media entities as well.”bills_006